Candice Lin


  • Candice Lin, System for a Stain, 2016. Wood, glass jars, cochineal, poppy seeds, metal castings, water, tea, sugar, copper still, hot plate, ceramic vessels, mortar and pestle, Thames mud, jar, microbial mud battery, vinyl floor. Dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gasworks. Photo: Andy Keate. 

  • Candice Lin, System for a Stain, 2016. Wood, glass jars, cochineal, poppy seeds, metal castings, water, tea, sugar, copper still, hot plate, ceramic vessels, mortar and pestle, Thames mud, jar, microbial mud battery, vinyl floor. Dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Gasworks. Photo: Andy Keate. 

  • Candice Lin, A Hard White Body, a Soft White Worm, 2018. Porcelain objects, porcelain slip, water, distillation system, urine, bricks, plants, porcelain, wood, books, photographs, drawings, dried plants, remnants of dead mushrooms, glass jars, hotplate, burnt sugar, kettle, pitcher, pumping system, dead silk worms, cacao pod, Detox Tea, plastic sheeting, video. Courtesy of the artist; Portikus, Frankfurt; and François Ghebaly, Los Angeles. Photo: Helena Schlichting

  • Candice Lin, A Hard White Body, a Soft White Worm, 2018. Porcelain objects, porcelain slip, water, distillation system, urine, bricks, plants, porcelain, wood, books, photographs, drawings, dried plants, remnants of dead mushrooms, glass jars, hotplate, burnt sugar, kettle, pitcher, pumping system, dead silk worms, cacao pod, Detox Tea, plastic sheeting, video. Courtesy of the artist; Portikus, Frankfurt; and François Ghebaly, Los Angeles. Photo: Helena Schlichting


Exhibition

Feb 4 – Apr 10, 2022
Levels 1 and 3


Los Angeles-based artist Candice Lin (b. 1979) investigates the legacies of colonialism, racism, and sexism by mapping the trade routes and material histories of a range of colonial goods. Often taking shape as DIY apparatuses, or what have been described as “flayed circulatory systems,” her multilayered and sensorial installations combine commodities such as sugar, cochineal, and tea into liquid distillates that circumnavigate the space of the gallery. Lin’s sculptures manifest as tangible inquiries into histories of exoticism, Western degradation of and desire for the “Other,” and the logic and legacy of oppressive structures and systems.

Co-organized by the Carpenter Center for Visual Arts and the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, Lin is creating a site-specific installation that responds to the space of the gallery at each institution, thereby allowing the shape of the work to evolve over the course of its presentation. The exhibition will be accompanied by a richly illustrated catalogue documenting the artist’s research materials and process, with contributions by the Mel Y. Chen, Julia Bryan Wilson, and the exhibition’s curators.

Curators: Dan Byers, John R. and Barbara Robinson Family Director, the Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts, Harvard University; and Victoria Sung, Assistant Curator of Visual Arts, Walker Art Center.


Candice Lin

Candice Lin is an interdisciplinary artist who works with installation, drawing, video, and living materials and processes such as mold, mushrooms, bacteria, fermentation, and stains. She addresses themes of race, gender, and sexuality in relationship to material histories of colonialism, slavery, and diaspora. Lin has had recent solo exhibitions at the Pitzer Galleries, Claremont, CA; Walter Phillips Gallery at the Banff Centre, Alberta, Canada; Ludlow 38, New York; François Ghebaly, Los Angeles; the Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts, Chicago; Portikus, Frankfurt; Bétonsalon, Paris; and Gasworks, London; as well as group exhibitions and biennials at the ICA, London (2019); Para Site, Hong Kong (2019); Beirut Art Center (2019); the Taipei Fine Arts Museum (2018); Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2018); Moderna Museet, Stockholm (2017); the New Museum, New York (2017); and SculptureCenter, New York (2017). She is the recipient of several residencies, grants, and fellowships, including a Painters & Writers Grant from the Joan Mitchell Foundation (2019), the Davidoff Art Residency (2018), the Louis Comfort Tiffany Award (2017), a Delfina Foundation residency (2014), a Fine Arts Work Center residency (2012), and a Smithsonian Artist Research Fellowship (2009). She is Assistant Professor of Art at UCLA and lives and works in Los Angeles.


Generous support for Carpenter Center programing is provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.